Romanticism Practitioners

Who are the key influential practitioners?

J.M.W Turner

According to TATE (2017),  J.M.W Turner otherwise recognised as Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851), an English painter specialising in the area of romanticism landscapes. Frequent visits to see Turner’s father in London enlightened him to the financial benefits that sketching possesses. Turner regularly exhibited in the Royal Academy where he was a student from 1790-1796 and the paintings were primarily watercolour and as noted by Joseph Mallord William Turner Biography (2017)

‘Turner showed a keen interest in architecture but was encouraged to keep painting by the architect Thomas Hardwick’. (Joseph Mallord William Turner Biography, 2017)

Turner later progressed onto utilising oil paints and his subject matters would explore myth and literature, consequently challenging ideas and approaches undertaken by that of classical painters.

Fishermen at Sea exhibited 1796 by Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851
TURNER, J. (1796) Fisherman at Sea. [Oil on Canvas].

John Constable

As noted by The National Gallery (2017), John Constable (1776-1837) was another English painter also recognised for his romantic landscapes. Constable regularly made sketches within the landscape and these sketches became the foundations for many of Constable’s large-scale paintings. Similar to Turner, Constable also frequently exhibited his masterpieces in galleries such as the Royal Academy in London and Paris salon. However Constable’s work was better received and more successful when exhibited in Paris.

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CONSTABLE, J. (1820) Stratford Mill. [Oil on Canvas].

William Blake

According to TATE (2017) William Blake (1757-1827) was an English poet, printmaker and painter who was mostly unrecognised for his art during his lifetime; Blake is considered to be a prominent practitioner and key figure within the romanticism movement. In what appears to be a tradition, Blake studied at the Royal Academy of Arts and today, is recognised for his creativity and the use of diversity and symbolism within his paintings which openly welcome the notion of the imagination as ‘the body of God’ and ‘human existence itself’ (Tate, 2017).

the-great-red-dragon-and-the-woman-clothed-in-sun-large
BLAKE, J. (1805) The Great Red Dragon and The Woman Clothed In Sun. [Black ink and Watercolour Over Traces of Graphite and Incised Lines]

Henry Fuseli

Henry Fuseli (1741-1825) the Swiss painter and writer who was based in Britain and is another of the most iconic figures from the romanticism movement. Fuseli’s most recognised painting is titled ‘The Nightmare’ which first exhibited in 1782 at the Royal Academy; the main purpose of this painting was to intrigue and shock.

This piece of artwork references themes of folklore, science and classical art. The painting evokes associations with imagination and suggests ideas relating to the ‘dream‘. In this example by Fuseli, the idea of the ideal dream is represented through the woman who is asleep. In a similar manner, the idea of the nightmare is depicted through the demon/mythical-type creature that is represented upon the woman’s chest. This is supported by Psychology Today (2015) as nightmares relate to feelings associated with fear and anxiety. (Psychology Today, 2015)

fuseli_nightmare
FUSELI, H. (1782) The Nightmare. [Oil on Canvas].

James Barry

As noted by Encyclopaedia Britanica (2016) James Barry (1741-1806) an Irish artist recognised for his paintings of both historical and metaphorical subjects. Barry was primarily a self-taught artist, who studied with the support of Jacob Ennis at the drawing school of The Royal Dublin Society (Encyclopaedia Britanica, 2016). During this period, he attracted the attention of Edmund Burke(1729-1797) in 1764 who would later introduce Barry to Joshua Reynolds president of the Royal Academy in London. As Barry progressed he became both a member and become more involved in the Royal Academy (1773) in London.

John Butts (1728-1764), the Irish landscape artist recognised for his woodland and river scenes; was a prominent figure in providing James Barry with the necessary and fundamentals required to succeed as an artist.

commerce-or-the-triumph-of-the-thames-1801large
BARRY, J. (1801) Commerce, Or The Triumph Of The Thames.
[Oil on Canvas].

 

 

Do any of these practitioners influence you?  If so, why?

As photography, amongst other artistic mediums are frequently changing, it is intrinsic for me to have an awareness of historic and current artistic movements, ideas and practitioners who are making key developments. Furthermore it is important to not limit my inspiration and research to only photography, having a broad knowledge of information relating to art and painting for example will develop my thinking further.

Whilst reflecting upon the romanticism movement, and some of the practitioners highlighted above, it is extremely interesting to witness how the methods of painting and art have transgressed into photography. For example John Constable and his romantic landscape painting, titled ‘Stratford Mill’, 1820 the exploration of beauty with natural scences, rolling hills and blue skies and the concept of the sublime is seen in photographers such as Jem Southam (who shall be explored in a seperate blog post).

Reference List:

ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITAINICA. (2016) James Barry. [Online] Available from: https://www.britannica.com/biography/James-Barry [Last Accessed: February 2017].

TATE (2017) The Nightmare. [Online Image] Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/gothic-nightmares-fuseli-blake-and-romantic-imagination/gothic [Last Accessed: February 2017].

TATE. (2017) Joseph Mallord William Turner. [Online] Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/research-publications/jmw-turner/joseph-mallord-william-turner-1775-1851-r1141041 [Last Accessed: February 2017].

TATE. (2017) Joseph Mallord William Turner: Fisherman at Sea. [Online Image] Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/research-publications/the-sublime/joseph-mallord-william-turner-fishermen-at-sea-r1105568 [Last Accessed: February 2017].

TATE (2017) William Blake 1757-1827. [Online] Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/william-blake-39 [Last Accessed: February 2017].

THE NATIONAL GALLERY. (2017) John Constable. [Online] Available from: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/artists/john-constable [Last Accessed: February 2017].

THE NATIONAL GALLERY. (2017) Stratford Mill. [Online Image] Available from: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/john-constable-stratford-mill [Last Accessed: February 2017].

WILLIAM BLAKE, (2017) The Great Red Dragon And The Woman Clothed In Sun. [Online Image] Available from: http://www.william-blake.org/The-Great-Red-Dragon-and-the-Woman-Clothed-in-Sun-large.html [Last Accessed: February 2017].

Bibliography:

ART UK (2017) Henry Fuseli (1741-1825). [Online] Available from: https://artuk.org/discover/artists/fuseli-henry-17411825 [Last Accessed: February 2017].

ART UK (2017) William Blake. [Online] Available from: https://artuk.org/discover/artists/blake-william-17571827 [Last Accessed: February 2017].

ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITAINICA. (2016) James Barry. [Online] Available from: https://www.britannica.com/biography/James-Barry [Last Accessed: February 2017].

ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS. (2017) Royal Academy of Arts. [Online] Available from: https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/ [Last Accessed: February 2017].

TATE (2017) Gothic Nightmares: Fuseli, Blake and The Romantic Imagination: Room 1. [Online] Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/gothic-nightmares-fuseli-blake-and-romantic-imagination/gothic [Last Accessed: February 2017].

TATE. (2017) Joseph Mallord William Turner. [Online] Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/research-publications/jmw-turner/joseph-mallord-william-turner-1775-1851-r1141041 [Last Accessed: February 2017].

TATE. (2017) Joseph Mallord William Turner: Fisherman at Sea. [Online Image] Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/research-publications/the-sublime/joseph-mallord-william-turner-fishermen-at-sea-r1105568 [Last Accessed: February 2017].

TATE (2017) The Nightmare. [Online Image] Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/gothic-nightmares-fuseli-blake-and-romantic-imagination/gothic [Last Accessed: February 2017].

TATE (2017) William Blake 1757-1827. [Online] Available from: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/william-blake-39 [Last Accessed: February 2017].

THE NATIONAL GALLERY. (2017) John Constable. [Online] Available from: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/artists/john-constable [Last Accessed: February 2017].

THE NATIONAL GALLERY. (2017) Stratford Mill. [Online Image] Available from: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/john-constable-stratford-mill [Last Accessed: February 2017].

VISUAL ARTS CORK. (2017) James Barry. [Online] Available from: http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/irish-artists/james-barry.htm [Last Accessed: February 2017].

VISUAL ARTS CORK. (2017) John Butts. [Online] Available from: http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/irish-artists/john-butts.htm [Last Accessed: February 2017].

WIKIPEDIA. (2017) William Blake. [Online] Available from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Blake [Last Accessed: February 2017].

 

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